Classic Camaros For Sale In Southfield MI 48034

While engineers and designers feverishly worked overtime on the development of a four-passenger sports car they code-named the F-car, the Chevy public relations, advertising and marketing group prepared the world for the intro of a vehicle they called the Panther.

All through the summer of 1965 virtually every element of the vehicle’s design and development, from preliminary design sketches to clay designs, was photographed and thoroughly recorded. Chevy used the assets to develop a 30 -minute movie The Camaro for sale in Southfield MI , which was later on shown on TV and in movie theaters. They also introduced women’s clothing called the Camaro Collection and even a Camaro roadway race video game.


Chevy Camaros For Sale

In November, Chevy sales executives and creative people previewed prototype models at the GM Tech Center. Campbell-Ewald, Chevy’s venerable advertising agency, immediately started deal with brochures, direct-mail advertising and sales promo materials, along with print, outdoor and TV/radio marketing. In April 1966, at the New york city Automobile Show Press Conference, Chevrolet sales executives admitted no name had actually been selected for the brand-new vehicle, but did announce that prices of 1967 Chevy Camaro for sale in  Southfield MI model will remain in the Corvair-Chevy II range.

Throughout early 1966 Chevy agonized over a name for its Mustang-killer. GM’s upper management was nervous about the aggressive connotations of the Panther name. A similar bout of cold feet would later trigger the Pontiac variation, code word the Banshee, to be renamed Firebird. Over its brief life time, the F-car had been called by many names consisting of Wildcat, Chaparral, Commander and Nova. It’s also reported that Chevy thought about using the letters “GM” in the name, and came up with G-Mini, which evolved into GeMini and lastly Gemini. However, GM’s upper management banned the concept, fearing the vehicle might be a failure.

Automotive legend has it that someone at Chevrolet lastly proposed the name Camaro and upper management quickly concurred. Although the name has no real significance, GM scientists reportedly found the word in a French dictionary as a slang term for “good friend” or “companion.” It’s reported that Ford Motor Business researchers also discovered other definitions, including “a shrimp-like animal” and an arcane term for “loose bowels.”

Because a number or pre-launch materials had currently been launched utilizing the Panther name, Chevy’s the majority of pushing challenge was to now rename their brand-new Mustang killer, the Camaro. Camaros are found in Southfield MI  by looking for classic car dealers.

Lastly, on June 28, 1966, General Motors held a live press conference in Detroit’s Statler-Hilton Hotel. It was the very first time in history that 14 cities were attached in real time for a press conference via telephone lines. Elliot M. “Pete” Estes, who replaced “Bunkie” Knudsen as Chevrolet General Supervisor in July 1965, started the news conference by stating all individuals were now charter members of the Society for the Elimination of Panthers from the Automotive World (SEPAW.) Estes with confidence revealed that Camaro was picked as the name for Chevy’s brand-new four-passenger cars to honor the tradition of starting Chevy design names with the letter C such as the Corvette, Corvair, Chevelle, and Chevy II.